Tie-dye with a twist

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tie dye

We recently spent the day tie-dyeing in our summer camps. A summer classic, tie-dye never fails to disappoint—kids are inevitably thrilled with the results and the process is a lot of fun.

Kids’ amusement is as good a reason as any for an art project, but the reason we return to tie-dying again and again has more to do with what the process models, encouraging children to experiment with materials, to make choices—often blindly—and be comfortable not knowing what their finished product might look like. For us, success isn’t necessarily measured by a project’s final form, but through the discovery and delight generated throughout its production.

As Sir Ken Robinson has famously said, “If you’re not prepared to be wrong, you’ll never come up with anything original.” It’s an idea we think about often in the Galleries’ education department and one that can be a powerful revelation—having things turn out differently than expected isn’t always so terrible. Such outcomes provide a foundation on which to build confidence and creativity, to develop problem-solving skills, gain access to important forms of self-expression, and to discover new ideas. In fact, some of our greatest artistic achievements—in summer camps and otherwise!—have come from accidents, mistakes or oversights. Little bloopers like these, simple as they may seem, can really add up to create rewarding relationships with our own imaginations.

Bet you’ll never look at tie-dye the same way again!

My Kid Could Do That

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GG052017

“My kid could do that.” It’s a comment we hear from time to time at the Galleries, especially when we’re showing artwork that might, at first glance, seem deceptively simple to produce. More often than not, these remarks lead us to the best kinds of conversations with our visitors, about how and why contemporary artists do what they do, about what we want from art and about why we value some kinds of aesthetics over others.

But what’s so bad about kid’s art anyway? Anyone who’s stepped foot in a primary school classroom knows there’s some pretty genius stuff going on in there. A couple of years ago, an unnamed first grader from New York City got more than a bit of attention in literary circles for a poem they wrote during National Poetry Month:

We did the soft wind.
We danst slowly. We swrld
Aroned. We danst soft.
We lisin to the mozik.
We danst to the mozik.
We made personal space.

It was Sojourner Truth Parsons, one of the artists currently on view at the Galleries, that sent this poem our way, proof positive that kids have moments of brilliance that rival their adult peers.

Parsons’ own works are often lauded for their wonderfully ingenuous point of view. With their poppy colours, sparkling glitter and deliciously loose brushwork, these pieces are a delight for the eyes, and make for especially great viewing for our youngest audience members. That was confirmed this morning when we opened our doors before regular hours so that families and babies could enjoy an exhibition tour, story and song time, and a craft inspired by Parsons’ work. Hosted in partnership with the Oakville Public Library, the program saw moms, grandmas, aunties, and babies come with open eyes and open minds to turn out some lovely little artworks.

Child’s play

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LeporelliWith most of Oakville Galleries’ education programs running at our location in Gairloch Gardens, it’s easy to identify what we do with this place. A conversation I have almost daily is how stunning it is here. And it is! The gardens, lake and horizon are all pretty spectacular. But what makes Gairloch so special, I think, isn’t just the view beyond our windows, but all the formative encounters with art that take place within our walls.

A few weeks ago, we hosted a group of local moms and toddlers for an exhibition tour and artmaking workshop. For a few of the little ones, it wasn’t just their first time visiting a gallery, it was their first time getting to paint! A two-year old boy learned how to hold a paintbrush for the first time; a little girl discovered finger painting, using every colour she could get her hands on; another was blown away to see how red and white mix together to make pink. These are the moments—moments that have happened thousands upon thousands of times here—that make Gairloch such a wonderful place to come to work every day. What may seem at first glance like child’s play is really a milestone for parents and children: in their cognitive and creative development, and in their relationship with each other.

Want to experience a little of the magic firsthand? Come by our free Family Day workshop this coming Monday and see where it can lead! Or bring the whole family to visit one of our exhibitions and follow it with some at-home craft time. You’ll be delighted to see what creativity it prompts.

Tie-dye with a twist

Posted on by .

tie dye

We recently spent the day tie-dyeing in our summer camps. A summer classic, tie-dye never fails to disappoint—kids are inevitably thrilled with the results and the process is a lot of fun.

Kids’ amusement is as good a reason as any for an art project, but the reason we return to tie-dying again and again has more to do with what the process models, encouraging children to experiment with materials, to make choices—often blindly—and be comfortable not knowing what their finished product might look like. For us, success isn’t necessarily measured by a project’s final form, but through the discovery and delight generated throughout its production.

As Sir Ken Robinson has famously said, “If you’re not prepared to be wrong, you’ll never come up with anything original.” It’s an idea we think about often in the Galleries’ education department and one that can be a powerful revelation—having things turn out differently than expected isn’t always so terrible. Such outcomes provide a foundation on which to build confidence and creativity, to develop problem-solving skills, gain access to important forms of self-expression, and to discover new ideas. In fact, some of our greatest artistic achievements—in summer camps and otherwise!—have come from accidents, mistakes or oversights. Little bloopers like these, simple as they may seem, can really add up to create rewarding relationships with our own imaginations.

Bet you’ll never look at tie-dye the same way again!

My Kid Could Do That

Posted on by .

GG052017

“My kid could do that.” It’s a comment we hear from time to time at the Galleries, especially when we’re showing artwork that might, at first glance, seem deceptively simple to produce. More often than not, these remarks lead us to the best kinds of conversations with our visitors, about how and why contemporary artists do what they do, about what we want from art and about why we value some kinds of aesthetics over others.

But what’s so bad about kid’s art anyway? Anyone who’s stepped foot in a primary school classroom knows there’s some pretty genius stuff going on in there. A couple of years ago, an unnamed first grader from New York City got more than a bit of attention in literary circles for a poem they wrote during National Poetry Month:

We did the soft wind.
We danst slowly. We swrld
Aroned. We danst soft.
We lisin to the mozik.
We danst to the mozik.
We made personal space.

It was Sojourner Truth Parsons, one of the artists currently on view at the Galleries, that sent this poem our way, proof positive that kids have moments of brilliance that rival their adult peers.

Parsons’ own works are often lauded for their wonderfully ingenuous point of view. With their poppy colours, sparkling glitter and deliciously loose brushwork, these pieces are a delight for the eyes, and make for especially great viewing for our youngest audience members. That was confirmed this morning when we opened our doors before regular hours so that families and babies could enjoy an exhibition tour, story and song time, and a craft inspired by Parsons’ work. Hosted in partnership with the Oakville Public Library, the program saw moms, grandmas, aunties, and babies come with open eyes and open minds to turn out some lovely little artworks.

Child’s play

Posted on by .

LeporelliWith most of Oakville Galleries’ education programs running at our location in Gairloch Gardens, it’s easy to identify what we do with this place. A conversation I have almost daily is how stunning it is here. And it is! The gardens, lake and horizon are all pretty spectacular. But what makes Gairloch so special, I think, isn’t just the view beyond our windows, but all the formative encounters with art that take place within our walls.

A few weeks ago, we hosted a group of local moms and toddlers for an exhibition tour and artmaking workshop. For a few of the little ones, it wasn’t just their first time visiting a gallery, it was their first time getting to paint! A two-year old boy learned how to hold a paintbrush for the first time; a little girl discovered finger painting, using every colour she could get her hands on; another was blown away to see how red and white mix together to make pink. These are the moments—moments that have happened thousands upon thousands of times here—that make Gairloch such a wonderful place to come to work every day. What may seem at first glance like child’s play is really a milestone for parents and children: in their cognitive and creative development, and in their relationship with each other.

Want to experience a little of the magic firsthand? Come by our free Family Day workshop this coming Monday and see where it can lead! Or bring the whole family to visit one of our exhibitions and follow it with some at-home craft time. You’ll be delighted to see what creativity it prompts.