From the archives: Deirdre Logue

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Deirdre Logue

On the occasion of Images Festival’s Canadian Artist Spotlight on Deirdre Logue, we’re throwing back to Deirdre’s 2008 show Beyond Her Usual Limits here in Gairloch Gardens. As part of the Spotlight festivities, we’re gearing up to release a new monograph on Deirdre’s work, co-published with Open Space Victoria, A Space Gallery, Gallery 44 and Images Festival. Join us at The Commons at 401 Richmond on Saturday, April 22nd from 3:00 pm to 5:00 pm to celebrate the launch of Beyond Her Usual Limits: The Film and Video Works of Deirdre Logue, 1997 to 2017. Photo: Cheryl O’Brien.

Collection Spotlight: General Idea

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1992.08_Gen.Idea

On the heels of opening Sojourner Truth Parsons’ exhibition Holding Your Dog At Night, where allegorical depictions of dogs abound, we’ve been thinking about General Idea’s poodles non-stop this week. The still above is from Shut the Fuck Up (1985), held in Oakville Galleries’ collection; it’s just one of countless instances where the regal dog appears in General Idea’s work. The collective’s use of the poodle has been widely understood as a symbolic self-representation by the artists, in part a nod to the members’ queer sexuality, but also to the cultural status of the artist, the fanciful pooch and artist alike known for their “effete banal image” and “desire to be preened and groomed for public appearances” (as relayed by the narrator in General Idea’s Cornucopia, 1982).

From the archives: Liz Magor

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9301-Pages from History-Liz Magor, Early Works

Longtime Oakville Galleries favourite Liz Magor just opened her retrospective you you you at the Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst in Zurich last week. Here’s a throwback to a survey of her early works here in Oakville in 1993, which included this terrific piece Dorothy, A Resemblance (1981), a portrait rendered through cast lead objects. Photo: Rod Demerling.

Collection Spotlight: Stephen Andrews

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2002.13As images of protests have filled our social media feeds over the past three weeks—really, over the past three years—we’ve been thinking of Stephen Andrews’ hoi polloi series from the late 1990s, images of crowds watching, being watched and protesting. This particular work, held in Oakville Galleries’ collection, was inspired by the mass demonstrations that took place across Ontario during the 1995 Days of Action, a series of labour actions protesting the Mike Harris government. Invoking the acute power of assembly and the energy borne of it, Andrews details for us those moments when power begins to shift from the body to the body politic.

Levine’s Restaurant: You Get More With Les!

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Levine's restaurant 1

On St. Patrick’s Day in 1969, Les Levine opened New York’s first Irish-Jewish-Canadian Restaurant in Manhattan’s Gramercy Park. Levine’s Restaurant drew on the artist’s simultaneous interests in mediated environments—utilizing feedback mechanisms such as closed-circuit televisions—and social frameworks, such as those dictated by dining out. New York magazine would announce the opening in its weekly restaurant column: “Artist Les Levine has […] opened a restaurant. Well, not quite a restaurant, but an ‘autobiographical culinary environment.’ … The food, like Levine, is Irish-Jewish-Canadian; the menu includes Mama Levine’s Special Entrees and Her Son’s Favorites, all served with rye bread, salad and potato latkas [sic]. All this begins at lunch and continues to 3am and there is a special discount of 20% if you are a Levine namesake. Levine has provided the electrically inspired stroke of placing five television cameras and eight monitors right in the center of all the Irish green and Israeli pale blue of the décor. This ploy makes everyone aware of everyone else, which is why a lot of people go to restaurants in the first place.”

Join us tonight at 7:00 pm for a free guided tour of Les Levine: Transmedia at Oakville Galleries at Centennial Square.

Levine's restaurant 3

Images: Levine’s Restaurant, 1969. Collection of the Museum of Mott Art, Inc. © Les Levine

Video: Down To Write You This Poem Sat

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Curator Frances Loeffler discusses the exhibition Down To Write You This Poem Sat on now at Oakville Galleries. Video by Mike Dopsa.

From the archives: Deirdre Logue

Posted on by .

Deirdre Logue

On the occasion of Images Festival’s Canadian Artist Spotlight on Deirdre Logue, we’re throwing back to Deirdre’s 2008 show Beyond Her Usual Limits here in Gairloch Gardens. As part of the Spotlight festivities, we’re gearing up to release a new monograph on Deirdre’s work, co-published with Open Space Victoria, A Space Gallery, Gallery 44 and Images Festival. Join us at The Commons at 401 Richmond on Saturday, April 22nd from 3:00 pm to 5:00 pm to celebrate the launch of Beyond Her Usual Limits: The Film and Video Works of Deirdre Logue, 1997 to 2017. Photo: Cheryl O’Brien.

Collection Spotlight: General Idea

Posted on by .

1992.08_Gen.Idea

On the heels of opening Sojourner Truth Parsons’ exhibition Holding Your Dog At Night, where allegorical depictions of dogs abound, we’ve been thinking about General Idea’s poodles non-stop this week. The still above is from Shut the Fuck Up (1985), held in Oakville Galleries’ collection; it’s just one of countless instances where the regal dog appears in General Idea’s work. The collective’s use of the poodle has been widely understood as a symbolic self-representation by the artists, in part a nod to the members’ queer sexuality, but also to the cultural status of the artist, the fanciful pooch and artist alike known for their “effete banal image” and “desire to be preened and groomed for public appearances” (as relayed by the narrator in General Idea’s Cornucopia, 1982).

From the archives: Liz Magor

Posted on by .

9301-Pages from History-Liz Magor, Early Works

Longtime Oakville Galleries favourite Liz Magor just opened her retrospective you you you at the Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst in Zurich last week. Here’s a throwback to a survey of her early works here in Oakville in 1993, which included this terrific piece Dorothy, A Resemblance (1981), a portrait rendered through cast lead objects. Photo: Rod Demerling.

Collection Spotlight: Stephen Andrews

Posted on by .

2002.13As images of protests have filled our social media feeds over the past three weeks—really, over the past three years—we’ve been thinking of Stephen Andrews’ hoi polloi series from the late 1990s, images of crowds watching, being watched and protesting. This particular work, held in Oakville Galleries’ collection, was inspired by the mass demonstrations that took place across Ontario during the 1995 Days of Action, a series of labour actions protesting the Mike Harris government. Invoking the acute power of assembly and the energy borne of it, Andrews details for us those moments when power begins to shift from the body to the body politic.

Levine’s Restaurant: You Get More With Les!

Posted on by .

Levine's restaurant 1

On St. Patrick’s Day in 1969, Les Levine opened New York’s first Irish-Jewish-Canadian Restaurant in Manhattan’s Gramercy Park. Levine’s Restaurant drew on the artist’s simultaneous interests in mediated environments—utilizing feedback mechanisms such as closed-circuit televisions—and social frameworks, such as those dictated by dining out. New York magazine would announce the opening in its weekly restaurant column: “Artist Les Levine has […] opened a restaurant. Well, not quite a restaurant, but an ‘autobiographical culinary environment.’ … The food, like Levine, is Irish-Jewish-Canadian; the menu includes Mama Levine’s Special Entrees and Her Son’s Favorites, all served with rye bread, salad and potato latkas [sic]. All this begins at lunch and continues to 3am and there is a special discount of 20% if you are a Levine namesake. Levine has provided the electrically inspired stroke of placing five television cameras and eight monitors right in the center of all the Irish green and Israeli pale blue of the décor. This ploy makes everyone aware of everyone else, which is why a lot of people go to restaurants in the first place.”

Join us tonight at 7:00 pm for a free guided tour of Les Levine: Transmedia at Oakville Galleries at Centennial Square.

Levine's restaurant 3

Images: Levine’s Restaurant, 1969. Collection of the Museum of Mott Art, Inc. © Les Levine

Video: Down To Write You This Poem Sat

Posted on by .

Curator Frances Loeffler discusses the exhibition Down To Write You This Poem Sat on now at Oakville Galleries. Video by Mike Dopsa.