Video: Who’s Exploiting Who in the Deep Sea?

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Curator Frances Loeffler discusses Cosima von Bonin’s solo exhibition Who’s Exploiting Who in the Deep Sea? at Oakville Galleries in Gairloch Gardens.

The exhibition is co-curated by SculptureCenter Curator Ruba Katrib and Glasgow International Director Sarah McCrory. Organized by Glasgow International and SculptureCenter, New York. This exhibition is part of Germany @ Canada 2017, Partners from Immigration to Innovation. Cosima von Bonin is a guest of the Goethe-Institut. Video by Mike Dopsa.

Collection Spotlight: Valérie Blass

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2012_03

With Cosima von Bonin’s sea creatures all around us this past month, we’re seeing underwater life everywhere we look these days. Gairloch Gardens has flooded repeatedly over the past week, as the stormy waters of Lake Ontario breach the lake wall and spill into the park. As bulldozers tried to get the lake water back where it belongs, we half-expected to see something akin to Valérie Blass’ Presque Plus emerge. This sculpture, held in the Galleries’ collection, sees Blass erect a beguiling pair of swamp-like creatures from just a ghillie suit (a camouflaging costume used by hunters and military snipers) and a found metal armature. Much like von Bonin’s works, this clever combination of objects carries a dark humour, an erotic undertone and an uncanny familiarity.

From the archives: Deirdre Logue

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Deirdre Logue

On the occasion of Images Festival’s Canadian Artist Spotlight on Deirdre Logue, we’re throwing back to Deirdre’s 2008 show Beyond Her Usual Limits here in Gairloch Gardens. As part of the Spotlight festivities, we’re gearing up to release a new monograph on Deirdre’s work, co-published with Open Space Victoria, A Space Gallery, Gallery 44 and Images Festival. Join us at The Commons at 401 Richmond on Saturday, April 22nd from 3:00 pm to 5:00 pm to celebrate the launch of Beyond Her Usual Limits: The Film and Video Works of Deirdre Logue, 1997 to 2017. Photo: Cheryl O’Brien.

Collection Spotlight: General Idea

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1992.08_Gen.Idea

On the heels of opening Sojourner Truth Parsons’ exhibition Holding Your Dog At Night, where allegorical depictions of dogs abound, we’ve been thinking about General Idea’s poodles non-stop this week. The still above is from Shut the Fuck Up (1985), held in Oakville Galleries’ collection; it’s just one of countless instances where the regal dog appears in General Idea’s work. The collective’s use of the poodle has been widely understood as a symbolic self-representation by the artists, in part a nod to the members’ queer sexuality, but also to the cultural status of the artist, the fanciful pooch and artist alike known for their “effete banal image” and “desire to be preened and groomed for public appearances” (as relayed by the narrator in General Idea’s Cornucopia, 1982).

From the archives: Liz Magor

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9301-Pages from History-Liz Magor, Early Works

Longtime Oakville Galleries favourite Liz Magor just opened her retrospective you you you at the Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst in Zurich last week. Here’s a throwback to a survey of her early works here in Oakville in 1993, which included this terrific piece Dorothy, A Resemblance (1981), a portrait rendered through cast lead objects. Photo: Rod Demerling.

Collection Spotlight: Stephen Andrews

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2002.13As images of protests have filled our social media feeds over the past three weeks—really, over the past three years—we’ve been thinking of Stephen Andrews’ hoi polloi series from the late 1990s, images of crowds watching, being watched and protesting. This particular work, held in Oakville Galleries’ collection, was inspired by the mass demonstrations that took place across Ontario during the 1995 Days of Action, a series of labour actions protesting the Mike Harris government. Invoking the acute power of assembly and the energy borne of it, Andrews details for us those moments when power begins to shift from the body to the body politic.

Video: Who’s Exploiting Who in the Deep Sea?

Posted on by .

Curator Frances Loeffler discusses Cosima von Bonin’s solo exhibition Who’s Exploiting Who in the Deep Sea? at Oakville Galleries in Gairloch Gardens.

The exhibition is co-curated by SculptureCenter Curator Ruba Katrib and Glasgow International Director Sarah McCrory. Organized by Glasgow International and SculptureCenter, New York. This exhibition is part of Germany @ Canada 2017, Partners from Immigration to Innovation. Cosima von Bonin is a guest of the Goethe-Institut. Video by Mike Dopsa.

Collection Spotlight: Valérie Blass

Posted on by .

2012_03

With Cosima von Bonin’s sea creatures all around us this past month, we’re seeing underwater life everywhere we look these days. Gairloch Gardens has flooded repeatedly over the past week, as the stormy waters of Lake Ontario breach the lake wall and spill into the park. As bulldozers tried to get the lake water back where it belongs, we half-expected to see something akin to Valérie Blass’ Presque Plus emerge. This sculpture, held in the Galleries’ collection, sees Blass erect a beguiling pair of swamp-like creatures from just a ghillie suit (a camouflaging costume used by hunters and military snipers) and a found metal armature. Much like von Bonin’s works, this clever combination of objects carries a dark humour, an erotic undertone and an uncanny familiarity.

From the archives: Deirdre Logue

Posted on by .

Deirdre Logue

On the occasion of Images Festival’s Canadian Artist Spotlight on Deirdre Logue, we’re throwing back to Deirdre’s 2008 show Beyond Her Usual Limits here in Gairloch Gardens. As part of the Spotlight festivities, we’re gearing up to release a new monograph on Deirdre’s work, co-published with Open Space Victoria, A Space Gallery, Gallery 44 and Images Festival. Join us at The Commons at 401 Richmond on Saturday, April 22nd from 3:00 pm to 5:00 pm to celebrate the launch of Beyond Her Usual Limits: The Film and Video Works of Deirdre Logue, 1997 to 2017. Photo: Cheryl O’Brien.

Collection Spotlight: General Idea

Posted on by .

1992.08_Gen.Idea

On the heels of opening Sojourner Truth Parsons’ exhibition Holding Your Dog At Night, where allegorical depictions of dogs abound, we’ve been thinking about General Idea’s poodles non-stop this week. The still above is from Shut the Fuck Up (1985), held in Oakville Galleries’ collection; it’s just one of countless instances where the regal dog appears in General Idea’s work. The collective’s use of the poodle has been widely understood as a symbolic self-representation by the artists, in part a nod to the members’ queer sexuality, but also to the cultural status of the artist, the fanciful pooch and artist alike known for their “effete banal image” and “desire to be preened and groomed for public appearances” (as relayed by the narrator in General Idea’s Cornucopia, 1982).

From the archives: Liz Magor

Posted on by .

9301-Pages from History-Liz Magor, Early Works

Longtime Oakville Galleries favourite Liz Magor just opened her retrospective you you you at the Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst in Zurich last week. Here’s a throwback to a survey of her early works here in Oakville in 1993, which included this terrific piece Dorothy, A Resemblance (1981), a portrait rendered through cast lead objects. Photo: Rod Demerling.

Collection Spotlight: Stephen Andrews

Posted on by .

2002.13As images of protests have filled our social media feeds over the past three weeks—really, over the past three years—we’ve been thinking of Stephen Andrews’ hoi polloi series from the late 1990s, images of crowds watching, being watched and protesting. This particular work, held in Oakville Galleries’ collection, was inspired by the mass demonstrations that took place across Ontario during the 1995 Days of Action, a series of labour actions protesting the Mike Harris government. Invoking the acute power of assembly and the energy borne of it, Andrews details for us those moments when power begins to shift from the body to the body politic.