From the archives: Liz Magor

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9301-Pages from History-Liz Magor, Early Works

Longtime Oakville Galleries favourite Liz Magor just opened her retrospective you you you at the Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst in Zurich last week. Here’s a throwback to a survey of her early works here in Oakville in 1993, which included this terrific piece Dorothy, A Resemblance (1981), a portrait rendered through cast lead objects. Photo: Rod Demerling.

Collection Spotlight: Stephen Andrews

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2002.13As images of protests have filled our social media feeds over the past three weeks—really, over the past three years—we’ve been thinking of Stephen Andrews’ hoi polloi series from the late 1990s, images of crowds watching, being watched and protesting. This particular work, held in Oakville Galleries’ collection, was inspired by the mass demonstrations that took place across Ontario during the 1995 Days of Action, a series of labour actions protesting the Mike Harris government. Invoking the acute power of assembly and the energy borne of it, Andrews details for us those moments when power begins to shift from the body to the body politic.

Levine’s Restaurant: You Get More With Les!

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Levine's restaurant 1

On St. Patrick’s Day in 1969, Les Levine opened New York’s first Irish-Jewish-Canadian Restaurant in Manhattan’s Gramercy Park. Levine’s Restaurant drew on the artist’s simultaneous interests in mediated environments—utilizing feedback mechanisms such as closed-circuit televisions—and social frameworks, such as those dictated by dining out. New York magazine would announce the opening in its weekly restaurant column: “Artist Les Levine has […] opened a restaurant. Well, not quite a restaurant, but an ‘autobiographical culinary environment.’ … The food, like Levine, is Irish-Jewish-Canadian; the menu includes Mama Levine’s Special Entrees and Her Son’s Favorites, all served with rye bread, salad and potato latkas [sic]. All this begins at lunch and continues to 3am and there is a special discount of 20% if you are a Levine namesake. Levine has provided the electrically inspired stroke of placing five television cameras and eight monitors right in the center of all the Irish green and Israeli pale blue of the décor. This ploy makes everyone aware of everyone else, which is why a lot of people go to restaurants in the first place.”

Join us tonight at 7:00 pm for a free guided tour of Les Levine: Transmedia at Oakville Galleries at Centennial Square.

Levine's restaurant 3

Images: Levine’s Restaurant, 1969. Collection of the Museum of Mott Art, Inc. © Les Levine

Video: Down To Write You This Poem Sat

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Curator Frances Loeffler discusses the exhibition Down To Write You This Poem Sat on now at Oakville Galleries. Video by Mike Dopsa.

Collection Spotlight: Colette Whiten

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Colette-Whiten

Toronto sculptor Colette Whiten has long been committed to exploring power and political relationships. For several years in the 1990s, much of Whiten’s work focused on the representation of anonymous women in the media—women seen waiting to vote, protesting in the streets or bearing arms against oppressors. Vows Vengeance (1993–1995) derives its imagery from a news story about Abkhazian women mourning their partners, soldiers killed at war. In carefully translating an otherwise fleeting news photograph into a concrete object—here, a meticulous beaded curtain—Whiten changes the terms on which we consider the image. Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid.

Collection Spotlight: Peter MacCallum

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2000_15_i1_Front

One of the earliest photographs in Oakville Galleries’ collection is this work by Peter MacCallum, who has spent more than forty years meticulously documenting Toronto’s architecture, industry and urban spaces. A slice of vintage Hogtown, Spadina Hotel at Night (1979) captures a bygone era at the corner of King and Spadina, with the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce on one corner and the legendary Spadina Hotel—whose Cabana Room was then home to a raucous underground art and music scene—on the other. Like many of MacCallum’s early photographs, this work alludes to the vibrancy taking shape in Toronto at the time, even as the city maintained a reputation for being staid and buttoned up.

From the archives: Liz Magor

Posted on by .

9301-Pages from History-Liz Magor, Early Works

Longtime Oakville Galleries favourite Liz Magor just opened her retrospective you you you at the Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst in Zurich last week. Here’s a throwback to a survey of her early works here in Oakville in 1993, which included this terrific piece Dorothy, A Resemblance (1981), a portrait rendered through cast lead objects. Photo: Rod Demerling.

Collection Spotlight: Stephen Andrews

Posted on by .

2002.13As images of protests have filled our social media feeds over the past three weeks—really, over the past three years—we’ve been thinking of Stephen Andrews’ hoi polloi series from the late 1990s, images of crowds watching, being watched and protesting. This particular work, held in Oakville Galleries’ collection, was inspired by the mass demonstrations that took place across Ontario during the 1995 Days of Action, a series of labour actions protesting the Mike Harris government. Invoking the acute power of assembly and the energy borne of it, Andrews details for us those moments when power begins to shift from the body to the body politic.

Levine’s Restaurant: You Get More With Les!

Posted on by .

Levine's restaurant 1

On St. Patrick’s Day in 1969, Les Levine opened New York’s first Irish-Jewish-Canadian Restaurant in Manhattan’s Gramercy Park. Levine’s Restaurant drew on the artist’s simultaneous interests in mediated environments—utilizing feedback mechanisms such as closed-circuit televisions—and social frameworks, such as those dictated by dining out. New York magazine would announce the opening in its weekly restaurant column: “Artist Les Levine has […] opened a restaurant. Well, not quite a restaurant, but an ‘autobiographical culinary environment.’ … The food, like Levine, is Irish-Jewish-Canadian; the menu includes Mama Levine’s Special Entrees and Her Son’s Favorites, all served with rye bread, salad and potato latkas [sic]. All this begins at lunch and continues to 3am and there is a special discount of 20% if you are a Levine namesake. Levine has provided the electrically inspired stroke of placing five television cameras and eight monitors right in the center of all the Irish green and Israeli pale blue of the décor. This ploy makes everyone aware of everyone else, which is why a lot of people go to restaurants in the first place.”

Join us tonight at 7:00 pm for a free guided tour of Les Levine: Transmedia at Oakville Galleries at Centennial Square.

Levine's restaurant 3

Images: Levine’s Restaurant, 1969. Collection of the Museum of Mott Art, Inc. © Les Levine

Video: Down To Write You This Poem Sat

Posted on by .

Curator Frances Loeffler discusses the exhibition Down To Write You This Poem Sat on now at Oakville Galleries. Video by Mike Dopsa.

Collection Spotlight: Colette Whiten

Posted on by .

Colette-Whiten

Toronto sculptor Colette Whiten has long been committed to exploring power and political relationships. For several years in the 1990s, much of Whiten’s work focused on the representation of anonymous women in the media—women seen waiting to vote, protesting in the streets or bearing arms against oppressors. Vows Vengeance (1993–1995) derives its imagery from a news story about Abkhazian women mourning their partners, soldiers killed at war. In carefully translating an otherwise fleeting news photograph into a concrete object—here, a meticulous beaded curtain—Whiten changes the terms on which we consider the image. Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid.

Collection Spotlight: Peter MacCallum

Posted on by .

2000_15_i1_Front

One of the earliest photographs in Oakville Galleries’ collection is this work by Peter MacCallum, who has spent more than forty years meticulously documenting Toronto’s architecture, industry and urban spaces. A slice of vintage Hogtown, Spadina Hotel at Night (1979) captures a bygone era at the corner of King and Spadina, with the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce on one corner and the legendary Spadina Hotel—whose Cabana Room was then home to a raucous underground art and music scene—on the other. Like many of MacCallum’s early photographs, this work alludes to the vibrancy taking shape in Toronto at the time, even as the city maintained a reputation for being staid and buttoned up.