Tag Archives: #TBT

From the archives: Deirdre Logue

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Deirdre Logue

On the occasion of Images Festival’s Canadian Artist Spotlight on Deirdre Logue, we’re throwing back to Deirdre’s 2008 show Beyond Her Usual Limits here in Gairloch Gardens. As part of the Spotlight festivities, we’re gearing up to release a new monograph on Deirdre’s work, co-published with Open Space Victoria, A Space Gallery, Gallery 44 and Images Festival. Join us at The Commons at 401 Richmond on Saturday, April 22nd from 3:00 pm to 5:00 pm to celebrate the launch of Beyond Her Usual Limits: The Film and Video Works of Deirdre Logue, 1997 to 2017. Photo: Cheryl O’Brien.

The view from my office

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For the past 19 years the view from my office window has always been breathtaking. Whether it’s blowing snow, damp and dull, calm and sunny, or windy enough for waves to be rolling over the breaker wall in Gairloch Gardens, the view of the lake never disappoints. I’m not alone in feeling this way—over the years, Oakville Galleries has exhibited a number of artists who have created site-specific works using this exact vista.

To me, these works capture milestones in the garden’s development, documenting how the landscape has changed over the past twenty years. As you will see in the four pictures below, the view from my office window is nothing if not dynamic. Each day is a new adventure in colour and texture. I see various forms of wildlife and get to hear the sounds of Lake Ontario throughout the day. I consider myself to be one of the luckiest people in the world—each day I experience a different view of the gardens and it makes me feel like I have escaped to the cottage, away from the bustle of life in the city.

1995_04

Angela Grauerholz, By the Lake, Oakville, 1995. Collection of Oakville Galleries, purchased with the support of the Corporation of the Town of Oakville, the Elizabeth L. Gordon Art Program of the Walter and Duncan Gordon Foundation and the Oakville Galleries Volunteer Association, 1995.

MFFT

David Rokeby, Machine for Taking Time, 2001-in progress, computer-assisted, site-specific video installation. Collection of Oakville Galleries, purchased with the support of the Cananda Council for the Arts Acquisition Assistance Program, the Corporation of the Town of Oakville, the Edna Powers Memorial Fund, and the Oakville Galleries Volunteer Association, 2001.

Ron Benner

Installation view of Ron Benner’s Trans/mission: African Vectors on view from June 2002 to November 2004.

Rokeby

David Rokeby, In the Offing (composite image), 2011–2013, computer, stored digital images, custom software. Collection of Oakville Galleries, purchased with the support of the Canada Council for the Arts Acquisition Assistance Program, the Corporation of the Town of Oakville, 2007.

From the archives: Liz Magor

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9301-Pages from History-Liz Magor, Early Works

Longtime Oakville Galleries favourite Liz Magor just opened her retrospective you you you at the Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst in Zurich last week. Here’s a throwback to a survey of her early works here in Oakville in 1993, which included this terrific piece Dorothy, A Resemblance (1981), a portrait rendered through cast lead objects. Photo: Rod Demerling.

Levine’s Restaurant: You Get More With Les!

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Levine's restaurant 1

On St. Patrick’s Day in 1969, Les Levine opened New York’s first Irish-Jewish-Canadian Restaurant in Manhattan’s Gramercy Park. Levine’s Restaurant drew on the artist’s simultaneous interests in mediated environments—utilizing feedback mechanisms such as closed-circuit televisions—and social frameworks, such as those dictated by dining out. New York magazine would announce the opening in its weekly restaurant column: “Artist Les Levine has […] opened a restaurant. Well, not quite a restaurant, but an ‘autobiographical culinary environment.’ … The food, like Levine, is Irish-Jewish-Canadian; the menu includes Mama Levine’s Special Entrees and Her Son’s Favorites, all served with rye bread, salad and potato latkas [sic]. All this begins at lunch and continues to 3am and there is a special discount of 20% if you are a Levine namesake. Levine has provided the electrically inspired stroke of placing five television cameras and eight monitors right in the center of all the Irish green and Israeli pale blue of the décor. This ploy makes everyone aware of everyone else, which is why a lot of people go to restaurants in the first place.”

Join us tonight at 7:00 pm for a free guided tour of Les Levine: Transmedia at Oakville Galleries at Centennial Square.

Levine's restaurant 3

Images: Levine’s Restaurant, 1969. Collection of the Museum of Mott Art, Inc. © Les Levine